fbpx

She worked to fin HIV prevention solutions for women in Africa.

Gita Ramjee

Durban – The family of South African scientist Gita Ramjee, who died from Covid-19 related illness this week, said they devastated and shocked by her passing. Speaking from the United Kingdom, Ramjee’s son Rushil said: “My mother was not only a pioneer and champion in her chosen profession but a rock in our family too.”
 
Ramjee was the chief scientific officer for the Aurum Institute and was world-renowned for her tireless work to find HIV prevention solutions for women.  He said they were grateful for the support: ” On behalf of the Ramjee family, I want to send our thanks to the scientific community for their amazing and heartfelt tributes to our mother. 
 
“We are truly touched and are grateful she has been honoured globally by the profession she loved so deeply. She really believed in her calling in life and that was to make the world a better place in any way she could.
 
As a family, we are devastated and shocked by her passing. My mother was not only a pioneer and champion in her chosen profession but a rock in our family too. 
 
“It is tough to put into words how she was as a wife and mother; kind, caring, loving, strong all come to mind when thinking about her. My father, brother and I are truly blessed. Her strength, strong will, determination and desire will continue to inspire us forever.
 
“My mothers legacy will continue through her work and us. We are so glad she touched so many lives and provided inspiration to health professionals around the world.”
 
He thanked all the doctors, nurses and family who rallied around her in her time of need. 
 
“We also want to urge not only South Africans but all people globally to be very diligent in these unprecedented times. Please listen to your respective government guidelines to protect yourselves and others,” concluded Ramjee. 
Gita Ramjee

Gita was Ugandan-South African scientist and researcher in HIV prevention. She was awarded the ‘Outstanding Female Scientist’ award in 2018.

Spread the word

Related stories